Saturday, October 20, 2018

Sick PET BIRD Care

English: Bird ringing (bird banding) sequence,...
Determining the bird's characteristics like sex, age, and physical condition
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
The article is directed specifically to pet bird owners and is intended for their use as a basic how-to guide on caring properly for a sick or injured bird. Please always follow the advice of your veterinarian & do not use this article as a means of avoiding a hands-on veterinary examination. The key idea of this article is to reduce any and all stress to your recovering bird.

1. WARMTH:
Ill birds will sit with their feathers fluffed in an attempt to conserve heat. The effort to conserve heat places an additional burden on the already debilitated bird. Your veterinarian will determine if your bird requires hospitalization, but if home care is acceptable, I recommend creating a tent to keep your bird warm. A bird's natural temperature is much higher than ours at anywhere from 103F-106F. Therefore, what often feels warm to us can be chilly to them and this is particularly true in sick birds. A simple way of providing heat is to cover 1/2 of the cage with a blanket and place a heat lamp on the other side as a heat source. Generally speaking, we keep our sick birds at environmental temperatures ranging from 85-95F. This will vary greatly with the individual bird so it is important to monitor your pet to ensure that you are providing the correct temperature and of course seek your veterinarian's advice.

A bird that is too hot will have very sleek feathers held tightly to the body, will hold its wings (shoulders) slightly away from its body and may pant. If you see any of these signs your bird is much too warm and the environmental temperature should be reduced accordingly. For night warmth I recommend using a red light. Ill birds, just like ill people, require rest and if kept under bright lights all night they will become sleep deprived. Also, during the day it is important to provide light so that they may be encouraged to eat and can be monitored. Therefore, the entire cage should never be covered during the day. I don't recommend heating pads because it is very difficult to regulate the temperature. If a bird is not perching and sitting directly on the pad they can easily become overheated or burned. And in my experience baby birds that are raised on heating pad quickly become dehydrated and again are subject to burns.

2. STRESS:
Debilitated birds must be kept in a stress-free situation. Often what appears normal to us can cause stress in our feathered friends. I suggest taking a close look at your bird's environment with a critical eye to determine what may be stress factors. Some common ones include, the bird in the center of house traffic with no chance to rest, cigarette smoke or aerosols in the birds environment, lack of darkness/sleep time at night, other pets, small children, too much visual stimuli (cage directly in front of a window), competition from cage mates, too much handling, poor nutrition and temperature extremes (such as birds kept in kitchens). I recommend that sick birds be left in their cage and allowed to calmly recuperate. 

Think of this as bed rest for your pet! Too much handling can stress the bird and will require the bird to use additional calories. If the bird is housed with other birds, it is usually best to remove the bird to a single cage. Some birds can become too stressed when separated from the colony so you should seek your veterinarian's advice on how to cage your sick pet. However, generally removing the bird from the group will reduce the stress of competition for nutrition and allow for medicating easily and better monitoring. Of course, if an infectious disease is suspected, then the pet must be moved into an isolation cage and at least a separate room - preferably a separate house with no other birds.

3. NUTRITION:
If your doctor made dietary recommendations, now is not the time to implement change. Changes in the type of diet will cause enormous stress to your bird and should be started when the bird has recovered. Always discuss how and when to made dietary changes with your pet's doctor. Generally, I recommend offering all the bird's favorite foods during illness because many ill birds become anorexic and can be lost due to starvation. If your bird is normally a seedeater but not currently eating, try placing millets sprays in the cage which most birds enjoy. The important thing to remember is that it has taken months to years for the bird to become malnourished and this cannot be corrected in a day or a week. Slow changes are essential for the ill bird. If you are unable to get your pet to eat he/she should be hospitalized for gavage feeding and further care. Birds have a high metabolic rate and can quickly starve.



Thus, a pet bird that stops eating should always be assumed to be critically ill, certainly, the potential for fatality is present. Lastly, if your bird is a hand reared baby and is not eating due to illness, you can often revert them back to hand feeding (syringe feeding) during the convalescent period. A good hand rearing formula should be used. The formula should be mixed with hot water as directed on the bag and offered to the bird. Do not force the bird to eat. Pet owners should never force feed their birds. A bird can easily aspirate (inhale food) and develop pneumonia and force-feeding causes enormous stress to your bird. Reverting to hand feeding is only of use for those birds that willingly accept feeding on the syringe. Also, if hand feeding, the formula must be warmed correctly (follow the advice on the formula bag and that of your veterinarian) to avoid food burns from too hot formula and crop stasis from formula fed at too cool a temperature.

4. MEDICATING:

Routes:

1. Injectable,
2. In water or Food,
3. Topical,
4. Oral

I prefer not to medicate in the pet's water or the food. Medication is given in this way often causes a change in the taste and can potentially cause the bird to reduce their food and water intake. Also, when medication is placed in the food or water it is very difficult to determine how much of the medication the pet has actually ingested. Thus, in my opinion, the best routes are injectable and oral. Topical medication often is not of use to the pet and will cause oily feathers.

Prior to taking your bird home, you should be shown how to appropriately medicate your bird by the doctor or technician. Briefly, the patient should be held in an upright position and the syringe containing the medication should be gently introduced from the left side of the mouth and angled to the right side. Most birds will attempt to bite the syringe allowing it to be easily introduced into the oral cavity. Slowly depress the plunger on the syringe to dispense the medication into the lower portion of the beak. If the pet struggles while medicating, stop for a few moments and then try again. You should advise your veterinarian if you are unable to medicate your pet. Medication can be mixed with a flavoring agent (FlavorX), which will help to reduce some resistance. Occasionally, depending on the reason for treatment, your doctor may be able to give a long-acting injection in place of oral medication but this has limited uses and thus is not available for every pet.

5. FOLLOW-UP EXAMINATIONS: 
As soon as the illness was detected in your pet he/she was taken to the veterinarian for a thorough physical examination and diagnostic workup including laboratory testing. Unfortunately, many people will see that their pet is improving and don't realize that a follow-up exam is necessary. I always suggest rechecking the patient at variable intervals depending on the state of debilitation. The recheck exam allows your doctor to assess the patient's response to treatment and the owner's compliance with instructions. Many times in the course of treating an exotic pet the treatment must be altered somewhat to ensure the best response. These rechecks are also used as a way of reinforcing the changes needed for the bird to remain healthy. Additionally, lab values can be rechecked to ensure that the patient is truly recovering and not just feeling well enough again to resume hiding any weakness. I can't stress the importance of this follow up enough, it is extremely important to the health of your bird.

Most importantly, follow the advice of your veterinarian and ask questions to ensure that you completely understand what is needed of you to get your pet back to health.

    By Jill Patt
    Jill M. Patt, DVM - Medical Director at Alta Mesa Animal Hospital
    Providing Small & Exotic Animal Pet Care in the Valley of the Sun (Mesa, AZ)
    http://www.littlecrittersvet.com - Pet Care Information & Photo Gallery
    Visit littlecrittersvet for extensive information on small & exotic pet care with > 1000 photos of animals from informative to just darn cute.
    http://www.altamesaanimalhospital.com - Alta Mesa Animal Hospital 6704 E. Brown Rd. Mesa, AZ 85205 (480) 981-1244
    Article Source: EzineArticles


Friday, October 19, 2018

Hot Birds Need A BIRD BATH

English: A fountain on a bird bath, with flowers.
A fountain on a birdbath, with flowers. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Just like people, birds get hot and thirsty. Especially during the blistering summer months, your favorite flying friends may be roasting in their feathers. Help out your local birds and provide them with a shady spot to splash, play, bathe, and drink—a bird bath! Especially in areas that lack natural sources of water, such as springs, ponds, lakes, or streams, bird baths are essential for the health and happiness of birds in your area. In addition to helping out your fine feathered friends, a birdbath will attract all sorts of birds to your yard and allow you and your family to enjoy their company.

Think of it: if you were a bird, where would you want to splash about? Would you choose a muddy, stinky puddle or a clean, fresh bird bath? The choice is not just obvious to humans, but birds have a distinct preference. Once you have decided to lend a helping hand to your local birds, make the trek to find a bath that fits into your style and design of your yard. There are tons of options, from baths that borrow style from the white marble columns of ancient Greece to fantastically modern creations that could double for an avant-garde statue.

After you have brought your birdbath home, find a place to set up the bath well within sight of your outdoor and indoor spaces. Consider installing a birdbath near your porch, patio, deck, or house’s windows so that you can enjoy the birds from anywhere in your home. Fill the birdbath with cool, clean water and watch the birds flock around your bath.

In order to draw more birds, consider using a fountain birdbath instead of a traditional birdbath that holds still water. Birds love the sound of running water and prefer fountain bird baths dramatically over still bird baths. If a fountain bird bath is out of your budget, consider creating your own fountain. Something as simple as a bucket with a hole drilled in the bottom positioned over the top of your existing birdbath works just as great as expensive fountain bird bath, although it may not be quite as aesthetically pleasing.

Keep in mind that birds need bird baths year round, especially in some parts of the country that seem to be out of the grip of Jack Frost. Instead of putting your birdbath inside during the winter, purchase a model that can remain outdoors for the entire year. Heated bird baths work to ensure that ice does not form in the bath, but does not produce a birdie hot tub, so birds will keep coming to your yard regardless of the weather.


Thursday, October 18, 2018

Raising Chicks before CHICKENS

This is a photograph of three chicks hatching ...
This is a photograph of three chicks hatching in an incubator.
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
There are two types of chicks to raise: the ones you practically took care of from the moment they were hatched and the ones that you bought from hatcheries which are already taken care of and just needs further nourishing. Basing from the two choices, there are also two ways of properly raising the chicks before becoming the perfect chickens.

Chicks hatched from your own poultry’s eggs basically need 4 things: comfort, warmth, food and water. Comfort can be based on your own personal touch and how you hold the chicks. Warmth is taken from the mother or if you plan to separate the chicks on an early stage, an incubator or what others call as a heat lamp is essential. Usually, the incubator is composed of two or three light bulbs depending on the number of chicks that have hatched.

The very first thing to do is fix the place where you will put your hatchlings – the brooder. It must have a temperature that is neither too cold nor too hot. Either of the two extremes will contribute severe negative conditions to the chicks. Your incubator must have a temperature that’s 90-95 degrees. If you have settled with the 95-degree heat, maintain it until the end of the first week. Your temperature must decrease every week by 5 degrees until you reach the 6th week.

The floor of your chick’s pad must be made of cardboard or piles of old newspapers. This can be used as an insulator for keeping the temperature in the room in proper condition.

Have the drinking station of your chicks always cleaned? Aside from that, the proper way of refreshing your chicks is to give them boiled water. Something as little as these creatures are too vulnerable to germs. Their baby immune systems aren’t that mature to fight away bacteria and harmful microorganisms that may invade their body. Better safe than sorry. Grain coffee is also an alternative but will cost you. You have to make sure that what you give them is not that hot to handle.

To serve their drink, pour the contents in a jug, turn it upside down standing on a dish. The leak coming from the inverted jug is sufficient enough to accommodate their need for nourishment.

Chicks are a little particular with their food. They don’t eat anything “old”. They want their food dripping with freshness. Initially, you could give them milled oats. You could include bits of boiled eggs into the milled oats. If you think to give them that is a bit too mushy, you are welcome to go to feed stores for poultry raising. Some who are fond of feeding anything to their chicks have this intuition to feed them bread. Which is totally wrong. Because feeding them bread is a sin. This can kill them.



You could also include lettuce cuts into the diet. Squeamish or not, you have to provide their favorite menu – bugs and grubs. They eat these little wiggly things and gobble them up so fast.

Just don’t make any mistake of giving these to newly hatched chicks.

You have to be very particular of the space that you have provided for the young ones. Cramping must be avoided. This might result in trampling and worse, cannibalism. Chicks grow quickly. That’s why you have to ensure that their room is big enough for their proper accommodation.

Do replace the cardboard or the newspaper placed under their pad every time you notice it’s soiled. Even you wouldn’t like the idea of sleeping in your own feces.



Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Different Types of DUCKS - What You Need to Know Before You Start to RAISING DUCKS

English: Tradewinds park, coconut Creek, Flori...
Cairina moschata or Muscovy duck with ducklings.
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
Raising ducks do not need to be hard if you know your reason. Ducks are mostly aquatic birds, mostly smaller than the swans and geese, and may be found in both freshwater and seawater. Some people use "duck" specifically for adult females and "drake" for adult males, others use "hen" and "drake", respectively. Somehow, they are sometimes confused with several types of unrelated water birds with similar forms, such as loons or divers, grebes, gallinules, and coots. Ducks are generally raised for eggs but when snail food gets scarce, they are sold for meat.

Before you start raising ducks, here are the different types for you to consider:

Egg - Type Ducks

1) Khaki Cambell Duck

Khaki Campbell ducks have characteristics brown color, have extremely active habits, do well in good range and show little desire for swimming. These ducks are good layers, they lay as many as 300 or more eggs a year which are fairly large, thick-shelled and weigh 70 to 75 grams each. The body weight at the point of lay is about 1.50kg. On the average, this duck could lay 285 eggs up to 72 weeks of age, with a mean egg weight of 75kg. This duck can be distinguished by their pure white feathers. Their eggs are either white or greenish.

2) Indian Runner
The Indian Runner Duck is a breed of domestic duck. They are native to the Indian-sub-continent and Malaysia. The breed, it is thought, was first brought to Europe via Whitehaven, Cumbria in the United Kingdom, by a sea captain prior to 1835, as they were exhibited at the London Zoological Gardens by this date.

This duck assumes a very erect normal posture with is the almost straight neck. The back is long, straight and narrow. An adult weighs about 2.10kg, while an adult weighs about 1.80kg. The egg production characteristics of this breed resemble that of the Khaki Campbell.

3) Tsaiya
This breed was developed in Taiwan. The original color ranges from black neck to pure white. Due to farmers preference, the brown breed was selected and raised as a major variety, while the white variety was developed for the production of mule ducks. Tsaiya ducks have small body size. An adult female weighs about 1.30kg, while the male weighs about 1.40kg.



Meat - Type Ducks

1) Muscovy Duck

The Muscovy Duck is a large duck which is native to Mexico and Central and South America. Muscovy is a heavy breed. It has a plump body and yellow skin. It has three varieties: the white, the colored and the blue. Unlike other breeds, Muscovy ducks prefer to stay on land.

All Muscovy Ducks have long claws on their feet and a wide flat tail. The drake (male) is about 86 cm long and weighs 4.6-6.8 kg, while the hen (female) is much smaller, at 64 cm in length and 2.7-3.6 kg in weight; domesticated males often weigh up to 8 kg, and domesticated females up to 5 kg.

2) Pekin Duck
Pekin duck was bred from the Mallard in China. The ancestors of those ducks originated from the canals which linked waterways in Nanjing, not Beijing, and originally had small bodies and black feathers. Sometimes it is mistaken for a goose because it carries its body rather upright. Pekin ducks are good layers, and duckling is ready for market at 2 or 3 months old.



Tuesday, October 16, 2018

PIGEON Auctions and PIGEON Racing

Carrier Pigeon
Carrier Pigeon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
All about Racing Pigeon Auctions
Pigeon racing is a sport of releasing pigeons that are specially bred, trained and conditioned for the races that generally vary from 100-1000 km. The winner is the bird that travels with the highest velocity.

Where to find racing pigeons?
The best place to find the racing pigeons are the pigeon auctions. In an auction, you can find a variety of pigeons for sale. There are a number of pigeon auction sites over the internet. There are different types of Auctions. They are:
  • Complete sell out: In the type of pigeon auction, the loft sells all the birds, clocks and pigeon supplies.
  • Loft reduction auction: this involves reduction of the number of birds in a loft. However, it will still take part in pigeons racing.
  • Special auction: special birds are put to sale in this type of pigeon auction.
  • Donation Auction: the special pigeon is donated to a charity or fund-raiser.
  • participating in any of the above pigeon auction ones should do his homework well. If you cannot afford to buy a trained racing pigeon, you can purchase the pigeons you love and train them.
  • Before participating in online pigeon auctions make sure that the auction company has a good reputation regarding the quality of pigeon supplies, qualities of pigeon racing lofts and the type of conditions and race courses the seller fly.
  • If you are attending the racing pigeon auction in person, then make sure to arrive at the place well before the auction time. This will give time to look over the birds and their pedigrees. As a result, you will be able to make a right decision at the time pigeon auction on which bird to buy.
  • If you do not have enough expertise in studying the racing pigeon loft take the help of experienced pigeon breeders. Assess the pigeons on the basis of the performance but not the appearance of wings, throat, back and muscles.
  • Sometimes it may not be possible for the fancier to attend the auction. In such cases, certain actions allow placing proxy bids or mail in bids well in advance. They even allow the fancier to place the maximum bid on a bird.
Regardless if you decide to find pigeons at auctions or you choose to breed your own birds, the sport of pigeon racing is one of the most enjoyable activities one could experience! Most fanciers have been breeding and raising birds their whole life and really just enjoy the process of raising and training their birds.



I have been making a full-time income reviewing products online. I take great pride in educating my readers with accurate information while also providing honest unbiased reviews. I hope I provided you with top-notch information that you can share with other people who share our same interests!

Pigeon racing has been an interest of mine for several years. I find the process fascinating from breeding to training to racing pigeons.