Showing posts with label Pet Bird Health. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pet Bird Health. Show all posts

Saturday, August 25, 2018

Considering a PET BIRD? Ask Yourself These 7 Critical Questions

English: Cockatiel Parakeet (Nymphicus holland...
Cockatiel Parakeet (Nymphicus hollandicus). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Birds can make wonderful pets and companions and there are many different birds to choose from. Two of the most popular are cockatiels and parakeets. Cockatiels and parakeets make wonderful pets that only require simple daily care. They don't take up a lot of space, they eat small amounts of food, and they don't require a daily walk outside. They love being around people and often want out of their cages just so they can be closer to you. Some even learn to talk.  

You're not alone in considering a pet bird. In fact, according to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association (APPMA), birds are the 3rd most popular pet behind cats and dogs. 
It all sounds great, doesn't it? Slow down a little bit, before you rush out to buy a cockatiel or a parakeet, take some time to think about whether or not you are ready for a bird companion. There are a few things for you to consider before you decide if you're ready for the responsibilities that come with parakeets and cockatiels.

Do yourself a favor and don't buy a parakeet or cockatiel until you ask yourself the following questions:
  • Do I have enough patience for a bird? Cockatiels and parakeets are social animals and they like attention. You should give them at least a half an hour of attention a day to keep them happy.

  • Am I a neat freak? All birds (not just cockatiels and parakeets) can be fairly messy.  You're probably going to have some feathers and bird seed to pick up around the cage.

  • Can I care for my bird properly? You're taking the right first step by looking for information about birds. It's important for you to know all of your cockatiel's or parakeet's needs before you bring him or her home. 
    Don't make the mistake of assuming that since you already have a dog, cat or some other pet, that you know how to take care of a bird.  Birds have very different needs than other pets.  I'm afraid it's a little more complicated than sticking your bird in a cage and giving it water and birdseed. 

  • Do I have room in my house for a bird cage and other 'bird accessories"? You need to think about where you're going to place the cage in your house before you walk in the door with it. And remember, the bigger the bird, the bigger the cage. (Be sure to study the do's and don't of cage placement. There are places in your house that are very dangerous for your bird.)

  • Do I have the time to give my bird what it needs? In addition to the time you should spend with your bird giving him or her attention, you should spend some time preparing meals for your bird.  A proper diet for a healthy cockatiel or parakeet includes fresh vegetables and fruits - not just seeds.

  • Exactly what type of bird (and how many) do I want? Decide whether you want a female or a male bird. Maybe you would like to have a pair of birds so that you can breed them. It's easier to think through these types of questions now instead of waiting until you're talking to a breeder.

  • Am I ready for a long-term commitment? As I said above, it's not unusual for cockatiels to live 15-20 years and parakeets can live 12-14 years. Getting a pet bird is a long-term commitment. Please don't get a cockatiel or a parakeet thinking that you're going to "try it for a while". There are already too many birds in rescue and adoption centers.
Pet birds can bring a lot of fun and happiness into your home. If you don't know what to expect before you bring one home, you may be in for a surprise. However, if you've gone through the checklist above and decided that you're ready for a new feathered family member, then congratulations!  Get ready for a long, loving and happy relationship.

Author: Simon Blake



Wednesday, June 20, 2018

PET BIRD Health

Pet bird Zip taking a bath
Pet bird Zip taking a bath (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
When you are considering buying a pet bird, there something that should be determined right from the start. This is pet bird health. You do not want to end up with a bird that is sick from the beginning. You should shop around for reputable breeders. This will reduce the chance of getting a pet that is already sick. Just to ease some tension, most birds purchased today are healthy. What can you do to reduce the risk and get a healthy pet?

As stated before, make sure to do your research and find a bird dealer that has a good track record. Your pet bird health should be guaranteed. You should make your best effort to get this guarantee of pet bird health in writing. If the store will allow it, get your bird's health checked out by an avian vet before buying it. If this can not be done, take it directly to the avian vet right after you buy it or at least by the next day.

When it is residing at its new residence, you the bird owner can look for certain things that indicate a pet bird health problem. What to look for to determine Breathing problems. Is the breathing noisy? Does it wheeze or pant? When breathing does it make clicking sounds?

Are the birds breathing heavy? Does it take short breaths? Does it breathe with its mouth open? Does its tail go up and down in a very pronounced manner?

Does your pet bird have some kind of discharge coming from its nasal area? Is the area around the eye or eyes swollen?

Has your bird lost its voice?
All of the above are signs of pet bird health going bad when it comes to breathing. Pet health problems can also be seen in the digestive system. vomiting or the bird regurgitating is one sign. Just like people diarrhea or a loose stool will signal a problem. Look to see if the bird's poop has undigested seeds in it, has blood present or has some kind of mucas in it.

Bone problems in a bird can be seen by looking for the following clues. Does the bird have a droopy wing? When you look at your bird, is it standing as it usually does or has its posture changed. These things could indicate a birds health problem in the musculoskeletal of the bird.



Pet birds can have skin problems too. Look for any bumps or lumps on them. Do the bird's skin flake more than normal or is its beak flaking? are its nails or beak growing too much? Learning your birds daily routine will help tremendously in determining if there is a pet bird health problem. By knowing what your healthy bird does, acts and looks like will help you see if he or she is sick.

When you have a pet, there is a need to store all of the pet stuff somewhere. A garage makes a great place. 


    By James Cropper - Article Source: EzineArticles          


Thursday, November 9, 2017

First Aid for PARROTS

English: Part of parrots world in KL bird park
Part of parrots world in KL bird park (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Unfortunately, accidents can - and DO happen, so it's always a good idea to be prepared! While accidents usually produce obvious injuries, illnesses are often kept well hidden by birds. In nature, if you're sick you pose a threat in making your whole flock vulnerable to predators, so parrots have become adept at masking signs of illness. This is one reason that it's vital to have a "well-bird" check-up annually. Needless to say, once a bird is showing obvious signs of illness, he's often very sick and needs immediate vet attention. First Aid is intended to help you get by until you can see the vet, or in treating minor injuries.

It's helpful to have a "hospital cage" for emergencies - a smaller, easily portable cage where you can isolate a sick or injured bird and easily move him to a warm, quiet, area of your home. It's advisable to have a quarantine area as well - for new birds coming into the home, as well as sick birds recovering from an infection. This area should be well separated from the rest of your birds to prevent air-borne transmission of germs, as well as those spread by direct contact.

Some of the signs of possible illness include: more time on cage floor, talking and playing less, fluffed feathers, lack of appetite, drinking more water, personality changes (such as becoming bitey or not wanting to come out of the cage), tail bobbing, puffy eyes, sleeping on both feet with head tucked, droopy wings, sneezing or coughing, "clicking" in chest, vomiting, diarrhea, soiled vent, etc. I won't go into specific diseases here, but hopefully, you get a general idea - if things are "different," get to the vet! Other problems include broken blood feathers or egg binding.

It's a good idea to put together a first aid kit - Include:
· Eye and skin wash
· Styptic powder
· Corn starch
· Antiseptic wipes
· Cotton Swabs and balls
· Eye dropper
· Assorted bandages - gauze, adhesive, vet wrap
· Scissors
· Latex Gloves
· Forceps or hemostats
· Betadine or iodine swabs
· Adhesive tape
· Penlight
· Heating pad and/or lamp
· Hydrogen peroxide
· Pedialyte (Electrolyte solution for babies)
· Hand feeding formula and syringes
· Phone number for vets and poison control
Generally, with any illness or injury, remove the bird to a hospital cage and put him in a warm, quiet, dimly lit room (bathrooms can work). Provide fresh water (and Pedialyte if needed). Feed favorite foods (healthier things you know he'll eat) plus warm foods like cooked rice or oatmeal. In addition, spray millet is often enjoyed by smaller birds. If he's not eating well on his own, offer some warm food with your fingers or a spoon. If need be, you may have to mix up hand feeding formula and give by cup or syringe. If you've kept your bird in the habit of eating from a spoon or cup, this will be easier. DO NOT use the counter remedies from pet stores. It's too much of a guessing game. I know a Pionus who became psychotic after being given an OTC bird "remedy" and would not stop thrashing around her cage. A little chamomile tea can help the bird relax and ginger tea is good for digestive upsets. If you're familiar with herbal remedies, you can safely use those without causing harm to your bird. NEVER give antibiotics without knowing your bird actually has a BACTERIAL infection (and which bacteria!)

Broken blood feathers (or those accidentally clipped) can be hard to stop bleeding. Do not use styptic powder on the skin or soft tissue - only on bleeding nails. Otherwise, use corn starch as a coagulant. If the blood feather (immature feather with live blood supply) won't stop bleeding, it has to be pulled or the bird can bleed to death.


A note on egg binding: If a hen is on the cage bottom, fluffed up and straining, she may be "egg bound". Put her in a warm, humid place (like the bathroom). You can rub some vegetable oil around her vent. Egg bound hens can die fairly quickly, though, and if the egg does not pass within several hours, she needs to get to the vet immediately (a good diet with extra calcium will help prevent this.)

So get in the habit of inspecting your birds on a daily basis, and being alert for signs of distress. Read up on diseases and gain a basic knowledge of illness in birds. "Bird proof" your home, avoid toxic fumes and unsafe toys. Have a first aid kit and hospital cage available. No what's "normal" for your bird and act quickly if things don't seem right. Find a good AVIAN vet and see them annually. Be sure your house and your bird's cage and play areas are as safe as possible. Feed the best diet you can to ensure your birds' best possible health. Wouldn't it be nice if your first aid kit never gets used?!






Tuesday, July 11, 2017

9 ways to protect our BIRD from illnesses

1. Good hygiene – regularly clean the bird cage and the appliances in it. The cleaning must be accomplished minimum twice a week . 


2. We must n't let our birds have contacts with wild or free – living birds, who are the main carriers of diseases and infections . 

3. Do not put the bird cage exposed to draughts – the birds can catch a cold , and they should be exposed to the sun no more than 1 – 2 hours , because they can get overheated and can suffer from hypothermia . 

4. If you have other pet animals – a dog , a cat, first get sure that they are not aggressive towards the birds and only then you can leave them in the same room together. 

5. Examine the bird cage for protruding parts and objects that can hurt the birds . 

6. A very important factor for the good health of the birds is the proper and balanced feeding . Except for grain mixture, they should get enough quantity of fruit and vegetables, from which they will supply themselves with necessary vitamins . 

7. Also, with great importance for the health of birds is the proper supply with minerals . You can buy them from the zoo in combined form. 

8. It is also necessary that your birds get small stones and sand in a separate container , which contributes to the good digestion and food – assimilation. 

9. Overfeeding the birds with proteins of animal origin is very dangerous for them and it can cause podagra and lead to abnormal appetite .