Showing posts with label Parrots. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Parrots. Show all posts

Friday, January 4, 2019

Hey Parrots Train Your Parents To Start Training You

Photo: Pixabay
Happy parrots enjoy training every day. Parrot potty training is one of the easiest things that we can learn.

If you want to be a happy bird like me you have to train your parents to spend time and invest in training you.  Let's face it we don’t like to be stuck in a cage or on our stands all day screaming our heads off.  We are going to live a long time so we might as well be happy.   Read on to learn how I was parrot potty trained.

If you’re not a happy bird like a lot of us are or were at one time, tell your parents to just start spending time with you.  One of my favorite things to do is to sing with my parents.  They’re not that talented so I enjoy training them how to sing.

For you parrots out there who like to come out once and while but you get put right back because of you poop on the floor or the furniture, tell your parents to start parrot potty training you.  It’s very easy to learn.  Here is how my Papa taught me.  He waits for me to poop in my cage while saying to me "sit" because sit sounds nicer than go poop.  Then when I do he takes me out and plays and cuddles with me for a short time.  Then he puts me back in my cage and tells me to "sit again" and when I do (so to speak) he takes me out and plays and cuddles with me again.  After a short time the only place that I want to "sit" is in my cage or on my play stand.  Tell your parents potty training parrots is much easier than potty training dogs, cats or even children.




Wednesday, January 2, 2019

SENEGAL PARROTS: Five Things They Love Doing and Some Other Behavioural Traits

English: Senegal Parrot (Poicephalus senegalus...
Senegal Parrot (Poicephalus senegalus) at Philadelphia Zoo. Photograph shows the front upper body. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
It is a pleasure for me to write in detail about five things which our Senegal parrot loves to do after many years of close observation of his antics. Some things, I hope, may still surprise other owners and I hope that I can, at the most, encourage people to own a Senegal and, at the least, add to the overall collective knowledge in praise of these little rays of Senegalese sunshine.

Firstly, if I may, a quick background note as to how we came to own our green and yellow feathery-beak of fun, aka Choi, for 15 years. He was the type of case wherein he was passed from owner to owner until my partner brought him home one day as the result of a rescue mission. No cruelty involved, fear not, but he had seen him (and we call him 'him' because to this day we still don't know what sex he is) at his friend's flat, whistling and walking upside down in his cage. He knew there and then that he would be the one to give him his final home as he had been passed 'from pillar to post' more often than any parrot should be and, fortunately, his friend gave his consent as he was really too busy to care for him properly. As it happened, I could not believe this was the same parrot I had seen in a cage hanging up in a fruit shop in the high street (in yet another previous ownership), whose legs were constantly shaking (now I realise with cold or fright, for they never shook once he was ours) and earned him the 'then' name of 'Shaky'. Little could I have imagined at the time that we would end up owning the very same little parrot. So, in short, our ownership of him was quite serendipitous.

Here are Choi's five fun things that he loves doing:

1. Getting Up Early On Sunny Mornings He instinctively knows it is a bright sunny morning despite being covered up in a dark room overnight. Just in the same way, he knows when it is a cold, dull morning and his enthusiasm to come out is as damp as the day. He absolutely loves sunny mornings, no doubt because he is from Senegal, so get out of bed, let him out fast and let him whistle, screech, fly around like a helicopter for all he is worth! He will dive-bomb you incessantly with his exuberance of greeting the bright day, so watch out, but it is all great fun and he will raise your spirits too. Garden birds at the window are at their liveliest in the morning too, so there is quite some 'party' going on what with all the noise from him and 'his' birds.

We decided early on that he was going to have a lot of freedom out of the cage during the day so we never have a problem with him flying around the room. Actually, we have found that he does not excrete all over the place as you might expect, but has his 'favourite' few perches where he lands with old newspaper placed on the floor at the ready, of course. It is worth giving him the freedom of the room to fly around and, actually, I would be concerned if someone owned a parrot that was confined to a cage all the time.

2. Chewing Cardboard He adores chewing through small boxes of cardboard - his favourite is an egg box. It must be that particular chewy consistency. We make a tent on top of his cage, like a sort of 'house extension', by putting his feeder pole in the middle to form a peak and then hanging his night blanket over it. He often walks in there like a Tyrannosaurus Rex (and those of you who have a Senegal will be familiar with that particular gait!) and lurks in the shadows, hiding behind residual bits of other cardboard. If you so much as tentatively touch a bit of cardboard box with the end of a pencil he will 'crash out' at you like a T Rex as well - yes, you know he can be very scary! One particular time, we noticed he was 'on a roll' with his cardboard chewing and kept bringing him in an ever-so-slightly bigger box to chew than the last time we came in, which he continually made an enthusiastic grab for.

They started to get beyond the bounds of what you would expect he could cope with chewing. It actually got to the point where we came in with quite a substantial size of a cardboard box and we knew when he eyed it up in readiness that this had gone too far! He was actually prepared and waiting to take this huge thing on board and start dismantling it! Suffice to say we diverted him with a monkey nut as you will appreciate when we discuss that much-loved item further down the list below. He also loves these heavy-duty whiskey bottle cardboard containers. If you dislodge the end bits it gives him the toughest chew ever and, even better, a tunnel to run through back and forth. It adds a particular challenge for him if you put your face at the other end of the tunnel and gives him extra impetus to 'charge'! This leads nicely onto his next fun thing to do...

3. Looking into Dark Tunnels I would never have believed how hypnotised he becomes with the sight of a dark tunnel. In this instance, I mean a certain 'shaping into a dark hole' of the neck or sleeve of a jumper you can achieve while it is innocuously lying on the back of a settee. If you open up the neck of an idle black sock into a shape of a tunnel or manage to shape a dark entrance to a hat when not in use, he will fly down and approach them with stealth, rattling into an entrance of said dark holes and tunnels and stand guard by them ferociously. We can't get near these items when this obsession has overtaken him! He has absolutely no fear of dark tunnels. There could be all sorts of beasts lurking inside for all he knows but it makes no difference. We have only discovered this peculiarly fun trait in him in the last couple of years and it is something we would never have dreamt would turn out to be so absorbing for him. Now we enjoy propping up hats, jumpers and socks in tunnel-shaped formats for his amusement (so long as it amuses us enough at the time too!)

4. Eating Monkey Nuts If we were to put three parrot-type tantalising foodstuffs in a row, let's say, a slice of tangerine, a monkey nut and any other kind of nut or fruit - there is no question that he would pick the monkey nut - the monkey nut wins hands down every time! It would not matter what the choices were, it is the monkey nut or nothing! I have tried to offer him all sorts of luxury nuts from Christmas packs but nothing else will do. He is very fond of cashews but, you guessed it, monkey nuts rule supreme.

5. Looking at Mirrors He has an extraordinary obsession with mirrors and he will roost beside his reflection contentedly for hours on end, after an introductory fight or flight session with his reflection of course. He has his own mirror noises. If we were blindfolded we would know by the noises that he makes that he had landed on a mirror in the room somewhere. Word of warning here though - don't let him land on a big vanity mirror on your wall for long or he will start chewing the frame. The same warning goes for pictures as he is attracted to the reflection of the glass within the frame, so beware. One of these fun activities that have to be supervised, I'm afraid.



It has to be mentioned at this point that if it had not been for his love of the last two items we would grievously not got him back down out of the trees when he flew up one branch too many one fateful days. It was actually Midsummer's Day - the shortest night of the year thankfully - when we took him down the country lane on a picnic with us. Stupidly, we were delusional about how well-behaved he would be with regard to staying close to his cage in our company. Of course, he was only used to the closeness of a room in the house and didn't know that he could really - really - stretch his wings out here. He had been sitting on top of his cage for a short while, not knowing any better than to do such, but when we leveraged a branch-type stick at him to climb on, it 'spooked' him a little as it was unfamiliar material and he flew up onto a nearby branch above us. Of course, he flew on up to another, then another until he positively revelled in the fact that we couldn't even see him through the thick greenery of the high-summer tree foliage.

It was the longest remainder of the day - a nightmare situation. There were endless periods of him ignoring our entreaties to come down when we did catch sight of him, then horror-filled moments of crows chasing him and I could not believe the number of birds of prey that were nesting about the trees at that time. We actually had to leave him overnight, believing him to have crossed over the river and never believing that he would cross back again. However, I heard him screech very early in the morning, after a blessedly short night, from far down in the field again and we hurried there with his cage. Suffice to say, after relentless flashing upon flashing with mirrors and long held-out monkey nuts he circled precariously downward towards us from the very tree I had last seen him in. God knows how he crossed back over the river to it and, seriously, God does know because I do consider it a miracle when I think about the horror of seeing some crows chasing him.

The point of this cautionary but thankfully uplifting tale is that, again, if it had not been for his love of mirrors and monkey nuts it would have been doubtful if he could have trusted his perspective to fly from the tree down to the cage again. Luckily he was extremely hungry. With one foot in the cage and the other holding onto the door, he had the cheek to act as if we were the Monkey Nut Men and he would just fly on upwards again after he had eaten his fill. A swift, smooth, firm, forward pressure manoeuvred him into the cage, however, and a similarly swift, smooth, firm closure of the cage door followed forthwith - as you can well imagine! He spent a full night and day asleep up on the curtain rail to recover. We remain humbled and chastened by the event to this day as to how we could have endangered him so by our stupidity. May I also add what an extremely brave little bird he proved to be by outflying his pursuers and surviving this episode, finding himself so suddenly out of his comfort zone? Such incredible courage. How on earth did he find his way back over that river? It made me believe in miracles.

Two final endearing factors... I don't know of a better 'Sir Jimmy Savile OBE' impersonation given by bird or mammal. You know the gorilla-thumping-chest type 'uh-ah-uh-ah-uh-ah' noise he used to make on 'Top of the Pops' (UK residents only perhaps!)? We still intend to shoot a video of it if we can ever get him to do it on cue.

Also, he never ever gives up trying to land on my partner's head or back, while flapping his wings furiously (very funny to watch!) when he sees a good 'strike' opportunity. It's taken in good spirit because actually, he is a one-man parrot and my partner is the only one who can stroke him behind the ears, under his chin and is generally the hand that feeds him and 'feathery' knows it. However, I love the way you can actually see him plotting and thinking, 'I'm going to get him today..yes, today...'
Suffice to say, I could never go back to a 'budgie' (budgerigar) after a Senegal parrot. We have no idea how old he is but we feel blessed to have him in our lives for however long we all shall live!



Friday, December 28, 2018

PARROTS Of The World

English: Congo African Grey Parrot (Psittacus ...
Congo African Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus erithacus).
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
Many parrots of the world have become popular as house pets. To some new owners, their particular parrot is the most beautiful. To other new owners, all the parrots of the world are gorgeous, with flashing colors of red, blue, green, and yellow.

Most of the parrots of the world come from warm climates such as West Africa, India, Southeast Asia, Australasia, South and Central America.

Parrot Families

All parrots of the world belong to the order Psittaciformes. In that order, there are two different families: Cacatuidas and Psittacidae. Cockatoos belong in the first family, while the second includes all the true parrots of the world.

Each family of parrots has subfamilies within it, and subspecies within that. Macaws, for example, belong to the Psittacidae family. Macaws are a subfamily group. Among macaws, there are at least 17 members:

* Hyacinth
* Glaucous Macaw
* Lear's Macaw
* Spix's Macaw
* Blue and Yellow Macaw, or Blue and Gold Macaw
* Caninde Macaw
* Military Macaw
* Buffon's Macaw
* Scarlet Macaw
* Green-winged Macaw
* Red-fronted Macaw
* Yellow-collared Macaw
* Chestnut-fronted Macaw, or Severe Macaw
* Red-bellied Macaw
* Illiger's Macaw
* Blue-headed Macaw
* Red-shouldered Macaw

Most Popular

People differ in their opinions of which parrots are more well-liked. Some look at the trendy parrots. Others consider the most prevalent in the pet stores. Some speak of which is more popular in this country or that, but of all the parrots of the world, the 5 most often dubbed popular are these.

1. Parakeets: The common Parakeet, Budgerigar to be more precise, is from Australia, and is often chosen as a pet for children or those who are beginners at bird care, partly due to its low price.

Colorful little "Budgies" are hardy, require little space, and are much lower maintenance than larger birds. They are very intelligent, and although content to whistle or sing quietly, some do learn a few words. The name "Budgerigar" comes from the Australian Aboriginal name for the parrot. It means "good eating" but most "Budgie" owners would be horrified to hear you say so. Among the many parrots of the world, this is probably the least expensive in both initial and upkeep costs.

2. Cockatiels: Other Australian species, these medium sized parrots are known for sophisticated whistling and singing. While they can be taught to speak, many people find that the birds would rather whistle, and mimic random sounds, such as a ringing cell phone. A disadvantage to the cockatiel is that it uses a powdery substance to keep its wings water-proof, so owners often find their fingers dusty after handling the bird.

3. Sun Conures: Among the parrots of the world, Sun Conures are one of the brightest. Their plumage is red, orange, yellow, blue, and green. Sun Conures have been known to talk well, but beware! These parrots often screech and scream rather than talk. Their 12-inch length means they will require a smaller cage than larger parrots, but you and your family may require earplugs. If you train your Sunnie to lower its voice, you will enjoy its antics, as these parrots tend to be playful.

4. Parrotlets: Parrotlets, especially Pacific Parrotlets, are one of the smallest known parrots of the world - about 4 inches in length! They are also one of the most pernicious and spunky of all the parrots of the world. These tiny parrots learn to talk in a voice that sounds like that of a robot. This tiny voice, their size, and the fact that they do not scream, make them ideal for those who need a quiet companion.

5. African Greys: African Grey Parrots are probably the most intelligent of the parrots of the world, and indeed, of all birds. These parrots are not as colorful as some. They are mainly grey, as the name implies. They do have a bright red or maroon tail, though, depending on the subspecies. African Greys excel at mimicry, sometimes learning as many as 1-2000 words. They learn other sounds, too, and may quickly learn to imitate a jet engine if you walk through an airport with them. Among the many parrots of the world, these may be the most demanding. Just like your toddler, these birds get bored and want their owners to provide entertainment. If you are looking for an intellectual, loyal, and affectionate parrot, the African Grey is probably a good choice.



How Many Different Parrots Are There?


All told, parrots of the world number more than 350 different species and subspecies! Due to loss of habitat, climate changes, hunting, and the trade in live birds as pets, some parrots have become extinct. Others are listed as threatened or are on the "endangered species" list.

Life Expectancy


People who purchase a parrot, purchase a commitment that is likely to continue throughout their lives and beyond. Most parrot owners are already 20 years old or more, and parrots themselves often have a life expectancy of more than 50 years. Some live to be nearly 100 years old. Added to that long life expectancy, many parrots of the world tend to bond with a single person. If that person breaks the bond in some way, the parrot may die.

Before you ask a parrot to be your companion, think it through carefully. The bird may outlive you.



Tuesday, December 25, 2018

SENEGAL PARROT - 5 Personality Traits That Make the Senegal a Great Pet Parrot

A juvenile Senegal Parrot.
A juvenile Senegal Parrot. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The African Senegal Parrot has worked its way up on the list of top picks for pet birds. Here are 5 of its best personality traits that help make it a great choice for a pet Parrot.

Quieter Than Many Parrots-Sometimes the Senegal is listed as a quiet bird which is absolutely true, except when it's not. Even though they are not prone to making screaming and screeching sounds as frequently as some parrots, when they want to be heard they have no problem making it happen. In their defense, they are not usually noisy except when excited or wanting attention. And as always, a lot will depend on your individual bird.

Can Entertain Themselves-These are pretty independent birds that do well without another bird sharing the cage with them. With a variety of toys that are rotated in and out of the cage frequently, they are happy spending their days exploring, swinging, climbing and chewing their toys for stimulation. They still will need to spend several hours out of the cage each day for proper exercise. They will also need several hours of human interaction daily to remain tame and to continue to foster trust and affection between caregiver and bird.

Talkers-Many learns to speak well, while others tend to sound mechanical when speaking. There are still others who never learn to speak at all but enjoy whistling, and imitating household sounds such as doorbells, alarm clocks, or microwaves. There are a number of videos and books written about the best way to get your bird to talk, but ultimately they are no guarantee that the bird you've chosen will do so. The best way to ensure that your bird will talk is to hear it talk before you buy it.

Highly Trainable-Senegals enjoy short, but regular training sessions for tricks with the outcome being great tricks and a stronger bond between you and your bird. Remember to go slowly, be consistent, and reward with a treat when they have done a good job for you. Never, ever, scold or punish your bird if it does not meet your expectations. This will only injure your relationship with your bird and lessen the chances of getting your Parrot to learn the trick.

Fun and Entertaining-With proper toys, perches, ropes, and a swing or two they are energetic birds that are highly entertaining. Watching them can be a lovely way to unwind any time you have a minute to watch the show.



Friday, December 21, 2018

Different Types of MACAWS, Some History and What to Look for From the Breeder

Photo: Pixabay
These Macaw parrots are beautiful and have very bright colors. They are part of the parrot family and there are several types. They originally come from Central and South America rain forest. In their natural habitat, they flock from anywhere 10 to 40 other birds. Macaws are very loud squawkers and screamers in their natural habitat echoes through the forest. There are plenty of nuts and fruit to blend in with and eat. There are 17 species of Macaws they are extremely intelligent and very social birds. 

They have long tail feathers. They will sleep in the trees at night for protection and in the morning they are out looking for snails, bugs, fruit and nuts. The male Macaw takes care of his family. They actually mate for life; he feeds the female and the young. They are a very playful bird and will make good pets if you put time and effort into training and socializing with him or her. That means training and learning all about the needs of these beautiful colored birds. Make life good for them and they will make life grand for you. You will have a great relationship together. There are several varieties that are extremely close to being endangered and they are the Hyac, Red -Fronted and also the Blue-Throated Macaws. There are two types sadly already extinct they are the Glaucus, and the Spix Macaw is gone from the wild. If you are interested in one of the Macaw do your homework. 

Because remember if you take good care of your Macaw they will live as long as you or longer. This is a lifelong commitment. You can talk with Macaw owner through forums and other internet sites for their experience and to learn more about the bird. The internet is a massive place to learn more about Macaws.

How to pick out your first bird:

Assuming you did all the necessary research. I feel the best bet would be a breeder because they have more birds to pick from of the same kind and has the most knowledge of the birds. This is very important to know as much about the Macaw as possible where ever you buy. Find out whatever information you can, this will help you with the discussion of the Macaw you want to pick. You could also buy from a reputable pet shop but most likely they will not know too much about the bird. Also, the most pet shop isn't going to have a good selection like the breeder.

You might also think about having your new bird checked by an avian veterinarian before you take it home. The breeder will sometimes have the bird checked out by his avian veterinarian he will have the result and the price of the bird will most likely be higher. They will check for the CBC and culture of the throat and vent and also a Chlamydia screen. One other thing you should know if buying from a breeder find out if the parrot is weaned or not. It is better if it is because this is a very stressful time for the Macaw. If you have other birds at home you might want to quarantine them for about 30-45 days. Just to be on the safe side. The health of your Macaw is very important.

Here are some Macaws you may want to look into.
The Blue and Gold Macaw:
A very popular, playful, and fun a loving parrot. This parrot usually adapts easily to its surroundings and has a very good personality.

The Hyacinth Macaw:

By far the largest Macaw it is nearly 4 foot in height with a very large wing span probably not a starter parrot. This Macaw would do better with his own room.

The Red Fronted Macaw:

This Macaw is about 2 foot high and has a very nice sounding voice.


Here are a few more you could look into.
The Scarlet Macaw:
The Military Macaw:

The Green-Wing Macaw:
In conclusion: These parrots need lots of room and a commitment to give them a considerate amount of attention. Some of their downfalls would be that they are very noisy and apartment live is probably not going to work. They are a lot messier than the small parrot. But if you have the room and the commitment these parrots are wonderful.

    By Glenn Byers
    I started internet marketing for extra income and found out I really liked building these small niche sites and doing the research on all the different subjects. I have some health problems which slows me down on my small farm so this helps me out. I get to meet people on the internet and sometimes help them with their problems with pet care and how to handle their animals. Just wanted to say thanks for reading my article and I hoped it helped someone out there. So if you get a chance, I have more articles on different parrots here, take a look at my website at http://www.amazingparrottips.com/
    Article Source: EzineArticles


Monday, December 17, 2018

BREEDING PARROTTS - It's Not As Simple As You Think

English: A female Australian King Parrot Categ...
A female Australian King Parrot (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Breeding parrots is not a simple task for the true parrot lover. I recently read an article written by a devoted parrot parent who described some of the trials and tribulations involved with breeding. Some of the difficulties mentioned were as follows:
° The death of one mating partner and the grief held by the surviving bird can often result in that birds death also.
° Abandonment of a nest of eggs or chicks.
° Death caused by illnesses such as egg yolk peritonitis.
° When weaning the chicks it takes a constant effort to feed and clean up after them. Your life and schedule is determined by the needs of the chicks.
° Breeding pairs are noisier than normal birds creating an undue amount of clamour.
° Sometimes the mating pair just don't get along and will not mate, and you now have two birds to try and find mates for.
° Selling the chicks once weaned, and having to deal with people who are untrained and have no idea how to raise and care for your chicks.
° Having to haggle over the price for your hand raised chicks.

These are just a few of the items discussed in this article. Nevertheless, the author continues to breed parrots because of those owners who do adopt, love and care for their hand raised birds.

This article illustrates that one should always spend some time researching matters like breeding before taking on the task. There's a great deal of information available for those contemplating breeding parrots that a person should read and study. It is not as simple as just letting a couple of birds mate, raising the chicks and then selling them off.

How knowing about breeding can help in parrot adoptions
When looking at the breeding process from the standpoint of a breeder, it helps the shopper for a pet parrot in evaluating their choice. If you're looking to adopt a parrot you should look for a breeder that shows the devotion, love and caring for their flock as the writer of the earlier discussed article.

The most important factors in setting the stage for a bird's future life are established during the weaning process. If a parrot breeder has shown, the skill, the love and caring while weaning a parrot chick, the person who adopts such a bird will have a happy and joyous addition to their household.

When adopting a parrot from a parrot breeder, a prospective parent needs to learn about what it takes to be a good breeder and then once armed with this information they will be better suited to evaluate how their chick was weaned.



A good breeder will be willing to spend the time with a perspective buyer to explain how the chick was weaned, what foods that particular species needs and likes, and other details needed for a happy life. In actuality, a buyer should feel that he or she is being evaluated to determine if they will make a good parent. If a parrots breeder shows this kind of concern, then the prospective parent may have just found the right breeder to adopt from.



Thursday, December 13, 2018

Essential Facts About LORIKEETS and Their Suitability As Pet Birds

Musk Lorikeet.
Photo  by Kiwi~Steve 
Unlike many other breeds of parrot, the lories and lorikeets are specially adapted to live on a pollen, nectar and fruit diet. A brush like a tip to the tongue, long narrow beak and special digestive enzymes are what makes them unique from other parrot type bird species. Small to medium-sized and often brightly coloured there are several species from Australia, which all have similar requirements.

There are over 50 species of lories and lorikeets in areas and countries nearby but only about 7 from Australia itself: 'musk lorikeet', 'little lorikeet', 'rainbow lorikeet', 'varied lorikeet', 'scaly-breasted lorikeet', 'red-collared lorikeet', and 'purple-crowned lorikeet'. I will mention each briefly with pet potential information.

Musk Lorikeet. Glossopsitta concinna.
(green keet, red-eared lorikeet) Weighing in at about 60 grams with a length of approximately 22 cm (9 inches).

The musk lorikeet relies on mainly native flowering shrubs and trees for food and can cause some problems in commercial orchards. In the wild, the musk lorikeet inhabits coastal woodlands and eucalyptus forests, often in large flocks of several hundred.

Very rare as pets in America and Europe but makes a delightful pet in Australia but still not very popular due to government regulations that require a licence to keep native birds.

Little Lorikeet. Glossopsitta pusilla.
(red-faced lorikeet, green parakeet) Approximately 40-45 grams and about 15 cm (6 inches) long.

Like others in the family, the little lorikeet eats mainly fruit, pollen and nectar but prefers to be high in the canopy of trees. In the wild, the little lorikeet inhabits East Australian forests, coastal heath and open woodland, and is very sociable often forming large flocks.

Not kept as a pet in its native Australia and a very rare pet in Europe and America.

Rainbow Lorikeet. Trichoglossus haematodus Malaccans.
(blue mountain lorikeet, green collar lorikeet, bluey, Swainson's loris) 125 grams approximately with a length of about 30 cm (12 inches).

Around flowering trees and sometimes in the company of scaly-breasted lorikeets, the rainbow lorikeet may congregate in noisy flocks of several hundred to roost and eat.

The rainbow lorikeet is very popular as a pet bird in its native Australia and also quite popular in Europe and America. A pet one can be a good source of amusement as they are always playing, and a young bird can become tame quite quickly.

Varied Lorikeet. Psitteuteles versicolor.
About 55 grams and average 19 cm (7.5 inches) long.
In the wild, the varied lorikeet is mainly found in large flocks in Melaleuca and eucalyptus woodlands in the tropical lowlands of Australia.
Virtually unknown as a pet in America and Europe and very rarely a pet in Australia with just a few in captivity.

Scaly-breasted Lorikeet. Trichoglossus chlorolepidotus.
(green and gold lorikeet, greenie) About 75-80 grams and about 23 cm (9.5 inches) in length.

Although common in urban areas where it makes use of nectar-rich garden plants, in its natural habitat the scaly-breasted lorikeet will form large flocks, often in the company of rainbow lorikeets. These flocks will travel from tree to tree in the open forested areas of its native land.

A quiet pet bird which is also playful and affectionate and can be taught to talk really well. This makes it a popular species of pet bird in Europe, America and its native Australia.

Red-collared Lorikeet. Trichoglossus haematodus rubritorquis.
Approximately 125 grams in weight with a length of about 30 cm (12 inches).

Unlike most of the other species of lorikeet, the red-collared lorikeet prefers to abide as a pair or in a small flock. These move around often due to their food source, the eucalyptus flower being a favourite food so they tend to inhabit the open eucalyptus forests most of the time.

Although good pet birds they are kept in low numbers because of availability and price.

Purple-crowned Lorikeet. Glossopsitta porphyrocephala.
(blue-crowned lorikeet, purple-capped parakeet) About 45 grams and around 16 cm (6 inches) long.

Will form large flocks where the food source is plentiful, including urban gardens and orchards. Their natural habitat in the West is in forest areas, whereas in the East they tend to go for coastal heath, mallee and open woodland areas.



Not very often kept as pets anywhere, but a little more popular as aviary birds.
All the above are kept in varying numbers in aviaries around Australia and the Western world, although some are not as popular as pets or companion birds.

If kept in an aviary a suspended mesh floor is best for ease of cleaning - just hose it down - due to the nature of the droppings, a solid floor aviary will require continuous cleaning.

Due to their special dietary requirements, they can prove to be difficult to give the right foods. 

Although the bigger species will eat seed, this should not be their main food but is suitable as an extra to their correct diet consisting mainly of pollen, nectar and fruit. And of course, any nectar-bearing flowers will be most welcome.



Saturday, December 8, 2018

Hawk Headed (Red-Fan) PARROT - Deroptyus accipitrinus

Hawk-Headed (Red-Fan) Parrot - Photo Wikipedia



Thursday, December 6, 2018

What You Should Know Before Buying A Pet PARROT

English: A pair of wild Senegal Parrots in a t...
A pair of wild Senegal Parrots in a tree in Africa,
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
Parrots are great animals. In fact, as a pet, parrots can be pretty entertaining especially with children who just love their mimicry. But like other kinds of pets, parrots are not all sweetness and light. They can also be a bother especially when you are not really much into pets. 

Here are some things that you have to take into consideration before buying a parrot for a pet. Read on and think long and hard about each item. Remember that parrots are not exactly cheap. Once you buy them, you won’t have any choice but to take care of them. 

1. Parrots are noisy

Mimicries may seem cute for a while but after several weeks of non-stop noise, it would eventually become a bother. If you are the kind of person who values your peace and quiet at home, parrots are not the pets for you. Their songs are not the same as the musical sounds that some birds make. The larger the parrot bird that you have, the louder the sound that they will produce. 

Do you know that they can even scream so loud, you’d be running for cover? Your neighbors will even hear it. A normal parrot will probably scream at least two times a day. A screaming match will probably last for about five to fifteen minutes. 

2. Parrots love to play with things

Remember that parrots cannot tell the difference between a wooden toy that they are allowed to play with and a priceless wooden furniture that your great great grandparents bequeath you. They can chew at it and you won’t be able to do anything about it. 

And sometimes, they won’t even be content with furniture. They can also chew computer and electric cords, books, papers and virtually everything that they can get their claws on. Wallpapers, clothes can also be clawed on. So, be very careful.    



3. Parrots can bite

They may seem docile creatures but they are actually not. Parrots can bite and they can claw. Even small birds can do this like the parakeet. And this is not just the ordinary bite that will not result in a big wound. They can actually draw blood and rip the skin. 

Some who bite really hard can even break the small bones. This is not to say that parrots are mean creatures. They are just scared of people they do not yet know. Their defense mechanism is of course to bite.



Saturday, December 1, 2018

Healthy Diet For ECLECTUS Parrots - 6 Essentials For the Eclectus Parrot Diet

July 23 - 31, 2009
Photo  by osseous 
Eclectus Parrots have an unusually long digestive track that gives them the ability to efficiently extract nutrients from their food.  As a result, they must have a very balanced and specific diet to help them stay well. In general organic foods are tastier, and healthier because they avoid the use of pesticides and chemicals. Here are 6 components necessary to keep your Eclectus properly fed and healthy.

Fiber - Because their digestive tracks are unusually long, fiber is necessary to keep the track clear and food properly moving through it. This can be fed to them in the form of legumes such as slightly softened garbanzo, fava, lentils, and soybeans as well as whole grains.

Fruits - They also enjoys and benefit greatly from fresh organic fruits such as apples, bananas, mangos, grapes, pomegranate seeds, watermelon, papaya, and oranges. Rotate new fruits as they come in season, and use thawed frozen fruits when fresh are not available.

Dark Leafy Green Vegetables - The darker the leaf, the more nutrients it contains. So kale, mustard and dandelion greens, Swiss chard, spinach, beet and carrot tops are excellent sources of nutrients and should be chopped into small pieces to make them easier to eat.

Other vegetables should include corn on the cob, broccoli, green beans and peas, and okra. Prone to have a Vitamin A deficiency, foods high in Beta Carotene should also be fed regularly as they are excellent natural sources of Vitamin A.  Cooked carrots, yams, and sweet potatoes should be staples in their diet.

Seeds and Nuts - Sprouted seeds are best because they are living plants, low in fat, and provide different nutrients daily as they continue to grow. Sprouts are one of the healthiest foods you can feed your bird. There are kits available that allow you to do it yourself, or you can buy seeds that are already sprouted. Be sure to provide them daily.  As for nuts, young birds still need some fat to develop properly,  but nuts should be fed sparingly to mature birds as they contain large amounts of fat that can cause health problems stemming from obesity.  However, an occasional nut (one) for a mature bird can serve as a tasty treat.

Pellets - Theoretically pellets are a great concept. Having all the nutrients packed into each tiny piece would seem to be a great way to ensure a healthy diet. However, some pellet mixes contain excessive sugar which can lead to kidney problems; and artificial coloring, preservatives, and flavoring that many pellet mixes contain can cause toxicity. Even the organic pellets which do not contain preservatives can make it easier for bacteria and fungus to grow-- which can pose serious health issues to your bird if ingested. So fresh foods always trump pellets.  And if you decide to use them, they should be of a very high quality and comprise a minute portion of the total diet. Avoid colored pellets at all costs as they prevent the Eclectus from producing properly colored feathers and beaks.


Table Food - Scrambled eggs that are thoroughly cooked, cooked rice and beans, and a cracker are all fine on occasion. Birds are lactose intolerant so dairy products should be avoided unless they are lactose-free. Foods with high salt content should also be avoided. Chocolate, avocado, alcohol, rhubarb and foods with caffeine are toxic and can lead to the swift demise of your Eclectus or any bird.

The Eclectus Parrot is an enthusiastic eater and will thank you for providing a healthy diet with many years of love and devotion.



Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Want a TALKING BIRD? Learn Which Birds Love to Talk

Sun Conure - Photo: Pixabay
Spending a few minutes chatting with a talking bird can brighten your day, and adding a bird to your family will provide a fun opportunity to enjoy the bonds that form when your feathered companion can talk. Many types of birds love to talk and their styles can vary according to their species as well as their temperament. While some birds may be able to memorize a few words, others can carry on full conversations. Here are the top pet bird types that have the ability to learn to talk along with their defining characteristics to help you decide which one will best fit your lifestyle.

Converse With a Conure
Conures are known for having the smallest vocabulary out of the parrot family. However, what they lack in words, they make up for in personality. Conures have a loud, attention-getting voice, and they sound more like a bird than other species. Although they can reproduce the human voice to some degree, you may also hear them chatter in bird talk while maintaining a human-like rhythm. They also have a surprisingly strong ability to mimic many different kinds of sounds, and your conure can keep you in giggles as they sneeze, chortle and chuckle.

Query a Quaker
Quakers have tons of personality and many bird lovers claim that their quaker can respond as if they understand the entire conversation. Perhaps this is due to their impeccable timing, which indicates that they may have some understanding of the intricacies of human language. For example, you may find your quaker telling you "good night" as you turn off a light, or they may say "thank you" when you give them some food. Quakers are full of surprises and this is one talking bird that can keep the one-liners coming.

Babble with a Budgie
Wiki CC
Budgies often get overlooked when it comes to talking birds, but according to the Guinness Book of World records, a budgie has earned the distinction of being "The Most Talking Bird" with a vocabulary of more than 1700 words. If you are considering getting a budgie, then be sure it is a male since females do not talk. Additionally, budgies pick up new words from their environment and are constantly adding to their vocabulary. Try leaving the radio or television on during quiet periods of the day and you will be amazed at how much your budgie can learn to say.

Gab with an African Grey
African greys are quieter than a conure, yet they also have the ability to reproduce different voices depending upon whom they are mimicking. For example, your African grey may sing a song in the voice of your favorite musical artist, or they could squawk "hello" in your kid's voice so well that you think they are in the room. As you teach your grey to talk, keep in mind that they learn words faster when emotions are attached to them. So, get excited when you tell them hello or call them a pretty bird.

Talking birds are a great addition to any home, and you can spend hours training your bird to communicate effectively. Whether you prefer a chatterbox or an occasional bit of birdie wisdom, there is a type of talking bird that will fit your preferences. Just remember that talking to your bird frequently is the best way to expand their vocabulary which means that you can get started from the moment you bring your new bird home.



Thursday, November 22, 2018

AFRICAN GREY PARROT- Psittacus erithacus

African Grey Parrot - Psittacus erithacus




Friday, November 9, 2018

PARROTLETS - Tiny Birds with a Big Attitude

Woodstock, looking studly
Photo  by BLW Photography 
Parrotlets, as the name suggests, are tiny parrots. It is, by the way, generally pronounced parrot-lets although some people insist that the "t" in the parrot part is silent and call them parro-lets. Although only 4 to 4 1/2 inches tall, they are true parrots with big parrot personalities and intellect. They are known for being a little feisty, but if handled regularly they are loving pets. They are very playful and like their bigger cousins can be taught to do tricks and to talk.


There are several species of parrotlet, but probably the most common for pets are the Pacific parrotlets. The males are predominately green with blue markings on their wings, rumps and heads. Females lack the blue markings. Although green is their natural color there are a number of color mutations available. They include yellow, blue and white. Parrotlets, with good care, can live 20-30 years in captivity.

If their wings are left unclipped they are very nimble flyers. They can hover and dart and perform some impressive aerial acrobatics that you don't see with larger parrots. Unless you have a large, safe, secure environment for them to fly in, however, it is usually safer for them and easier for you if you keep them clipped.

To be happy and healthy you will have to provide them with a cockatiel sized cage with a few toys, fresh water and food. A mixture of small seeds, a few sunflower seeds and small pellets make a good diet. Supplement that with some fruits and vegetables. If you have one parrotlet, it will become bonded to you and should be quite friendly. If you have two or more they tend to be closer to each other, naturally, and usually are a little less tame. Make sure you get a parrotlet that was hand fed as a baby. Hand fed babies are much more socialized to people and make much better pets. Like any pet bird, they require regular attention, but they are good at amusing themselves for long periods of time while you are away.



Parrotlets are relatively quiet parrots. They chirp and chatter a lot but they don't scream like larger species. That, along with their small size makes them a good choice for apartments or other small living spaces. They are fun to own, fairly easy to maintain and can be great little companions. 

    Author: Brett McGill - Article Source: GoArticles


Saturday, October 27, 2018

Busy Beak are Happy beaks

A pet Monk Parakeet (also known as the Quaker ...
A pet Monk Parakeet (also known as the Quaker Parrot) with a colourful rope and toys. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Good toys have different shapes and textures for the bird to explore and destroy.  At least three toys should make a bird work for food. Working toys are toys that make them work for their treats or favored foods. Parrots in the wild will spend the majority of their waking hours, hunting and foraging. Toys stimulate their mind and help replicate actions they would execute in the wild. Proper toys and placement enhance a Psittacines life in captivity.

Parrots think they’re working for food while avicultural outsider sees birds playing with toys as birds; playing with bird toys. Your companion parrot is always thinking, and since nothing has changed in their minds, playing with toys is their job. It’s what Mother Nature gave them to survive, this need to forage. If you provide no means of foraging, your bird will seek other avenues. It may be furniture or personal effects. Usually, because they are easy and plentiful targets. It’s important to encourage your companion parrot to work for food because it’s a natural behavior. 

Three or four toys should be made of soft wood. Softwood allows you to push your fingernail in forming an indent.  

The next toys depend on the bird. Large birds like macaws and Cockatoos may have a huge appetite. Introduce hardwood toys into cages and perhaps toys with hard plastics so they can spend more time on the various pieces. Toys may be strung together with rope, leather, chain or a combination of materials.

The balance of toys should be easily shredded. Toys may be store bought or home made. Parrot toy parts are available and help keep toy making economical.  Softwood, paper, leather and other textures are important for the bird to explore and destroy

Introduce pieces of food like broccoli or corn, using one of many commercially available or home made toy holders. The food on the toy holder rewards them for playing.

The more textures, shapes, sizes and colors the better. Diversity is important because in the wild your birds eat a diverse diet. An eclectic selection of toys helps maintain your feathered companions interest.

 Watch a bird in its natural habitat and you’ll see them chewing soft bark and hard tree trunks. Toys made from compressed palm leaf or treated Yucca introduces hours of “pecking pleasure” Interactive toys made from Plexiglas are very effective at reducing birdie boredom.

The majority of toys should hang or be placed in the upper third of the cage. Introduce a few more to the middle third (without hampering access to food dishes) around a perch made from soft wood, comfortable to grasp depending on the size of the bird’s feet. The bottom third of the cage should remain relatively uncluttered to allow the bird to walk freely.



Spot-check toys and perches on a daily basis looking for frayed or sharp edges that may potentially harm your bird.

The more you change the toy and perch arrangement, the more you challenge your companion parrot. It helps them socialize and helps avoids “toy-phobia” 
Parrots can develop phobic reactions to new people, new furniture, and even new birds.

Toys from household items

Cornhusks
Adding machine tape
Toilet paper roll
Nuts hidden in nested paper cups
Phonebook slipped through cage bars
Wrapped straws – cable tied
Fortune cookies
Saltine cracker packet
Junk mail
Cotton swabs
Doggie rawhide 
Shoelaces strung with beads or Cheerios 
Branches with leaves           
Breakfast-food bowl with newspaper taped to the top