Showing posts with label Toucan. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Toucan. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Chestnut-mandibled (Swainsons) TOUCAN

Swainsons Toucan



Saturday, November 18, 2017

The TOUCAN

Toucan Profile
Toucan - Photo by Eric Kilby
Indigenous to the lush South American tropical rain forests, the Toucan is recognized throughout the Americas, especially in the United States. Known for their unusual but unforgettably unique multi-colored beaks, the function still has scientists puzzled. Scientists and researchers have studied the different functions, but have not been successful in determining it purpose, although they have determined it is not used as a weapon nor is it used to gather food.

Toucans primarily feed on fruit while snacking on an occasional lizard or insect. The bodies are compact as the wings are too. Scientists have determined that the wings were built to fly shorter distances than other birds in the rainforest.

Toucans are often paired off or travel in small groups. Determining the sex of a toucan has been difficult as the male and female bodies are practically identical. Although some scientists believe the female beak is slightly larger and contains a square-like design.

Toucans have become one of the most popular birds in American popular culture. Many companies use it as a marketing tool as they have friendly dispositions, are aesthetically pleasing and embody a unique blend of characteristics. Moreover, they are starting to emerge as one of the most unique choices for bird pets. Additionally, they are often featured in various magazines, newspapers, advertisements, as well as many product lines such as in the Wild Jungle Chick greeting card line.

Vibrant colors, acumen, and the amusing traits these birds contain have made toucans one the most admired birds in both the rainforest and American pop culture.


By Karen Justice

Karen Justice, President of Wild Jungle Chick, founder of Tigre Lis Enterprises. Karen’s multi-talents in writing, painting, her zest for living, her lifetime passion for animals and her ability to see through failure has brought her continued success. Furthermore, her light-hearted nature, down to earth disposition, and even-keeled temperament has helped her remain grounded. Karen believes we are in this life together. What we do in some way affects others. She believes smiles are contagious and one of the nicest things we can do daily is to pass one on.
Article Source: EzineArticles



Friday, November 17, 2017

Fact Sheet: SWAINSONS TOUCAN - Ramphastos swainsonii

(Original Title: Rainforest Birds - Swainson's Toucan)

English: The Chestnut-mandibled Toucan or Swai...
The Chestnut-mandibled Toucan or Swainson’s Toucan (Ramphastos swainsonii) at Antwerp Zoo.
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Bird Name:
Swainson's Toucan

Latin Name:
Ramphastos swainsonii

Status:
Least Concern

Scientific Classification:
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Piciformes
Family: Ramphastidae
Genus: Ramphastos
Species: R. swainsonii

General Information:
The Swainson's Toucan, named after English ornithologist William Swainson, is a large near-passerine bird native to Central America and northern South America. It is the second largest of the 37 species of toucan, only slightly smaller than the Toco Toucan. It prefers to be solitary or in smaller groups as opposed to large flocks.

Physical Description:
The male is around 22 inches in length and weighs about 750 g. The female is slightly smaller at about 20.5 inches and 580 g, but otherwise alike in appearance to the male. The Swainson's Toucan's distinctive, brightly marked bill can grow up to 8 inches long. It is mostly black in appearance but has a bright yellow face and upper breast, with narrow white and broader red bands forming a border above its lower breast. Juveniles are of a sootier black color with duller plumage, especially with regard to the red border and yellow bib of its breast.

Diet:
The Swainson's Toucan feeds on fruits, which it plucks from branches with its long beak. It will also eat insects and lizards for protein, especially during the nesting period


Habitat:
These toucans occur in forests ranging from Honduras and Costa Rica down through northern Colombia. They are resident breeders in moist lowland forests, often nesting in tree cavities or old woodpecker's nests.

Reproduction:
Female Swainson's Toucans lays 2 - 4 eggs per clutch and will incubate them for a period of 14 - 15 days. After hatching, the young toucans are fed by both parents and fledge the nest after about 6 weeks.




Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Things to Know About a TOUCAN

Toco Toucan, head.
Toco Toucan, head. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
If you are considering getting an exotic pet such as a toucan, there are many things that you need to know in order to be able to take the best care of your new exotic pet. You need to make sure that you are prepared will all the information to take care of your new member of the family.

Toucans are considered to be a tropical bird but can also be a great pet for your family to have. The first thing that you need to understand is that your toucan may be very pretty, but these are also very intelligent birds that can be taught a variety of tricks if you want to work with them. These types of birds can be a great companion for your family and are very playful pets. If you have children, this could be a good pet for you because these types of birds have large beaks so they cannot bite anything. They also have a hard time even squeezing a grape. Although these look like large birds, they will cuddle and play in your lap if you allow them the opportunity. They will also purr like a kitten when they are happy. Toucans can provide a healthy relationship like this with their owner.




The next factor that you should be aware of is the type of diet that the toucan will require on an everyday basis. For most toucans, their basic diet is fruit and is required in order for these types of birds to survive as a pet. Bananas, berries, grapes, and papaya are great fruits to put as their diet for every day feedings. Fresh fruit is one of the most important parts of their diet and should always be on the menu. You should also consider avoiding fruits with a high citric acid content like lemons and oranges because they could end up hurting the digestive system of the toucan. There are also pellets that are made that can provide a source of iron to keep the toucan growing strong. You should make sure to use the pellets in conjunction with the fresh fruit that they should be getting on a daily basis.

Overall, these are a family friendly pet that is a great way to introduce your family to exotic pets such as a toucan. There are many responsibilities to this bird that can help you develop a great relationship between pet and owner.

Joseph Devine



Thursday, July 6, 2017

Fact Sheet: COLLARED ARACARI - Pteroglossus torquatus

(Original title: Rainforest Birds - Collard Aracari)

Collared Aracari
Photo  by mTuttle 
Bird Name:
Collared Aracari

Latin Name:
Pteroglossus torquatus

Status:
Least Concern

Scientific Classification:
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Piciformes
Family: Ramphastidae
Genus: Pteroglossus
Species: P. torquatus

General Information:
The Collared Aracari is a colorful bird that resides year-round in the jungles of Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. It is a toucan and has a distinctive long bill that is almost a quarter the size of the bird itself. It is a very social creature and usually found in flocks of 6 - 15 birds.

Physical Description:
An adult bird is around 16 inches in length, with its bill accounting for about 4 inches, and weighs approximately 230 g. Male and female are similar in appearance, each with a black head and a colorful chest of red, green, and yellow feathers. Juveniles are much duller in color compared to their adult counterparts, with paler underparts and a less distinct bill pattern.

Diet:
Although the Collard Aracari is primarily an arboreal fruit-eater, it will also feed on bird eggs and small prey like insects, lizards, and fledgling birds.


Habitat:
This near-passerine bird occurs from southern Mexico to Panama, but also extends into Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The birdi makes its home in the tropical rainforests of southern Mexico and throughout Central America. It is also a common resident in lowland forests and will often nests in natural cavities or old woodpecker nests.

Reproduction:
A female usually lays 3 - 4 eggs per clutch in an unlined nest. Both male and female incubate the eggs for a period of about 16 days. They young will leave the nest at 40 - 42 days.



Saturday, June 24, 2017

Fact Sheet: EMERALD TOUCANET - Aulacorhynchus prasinus

(Original Title: Rainforest Birds - Emerald Toucanet)

Bird Name:
Emerald Toucanet

Latin Name:
Aulacorhynchus prasinus

Emerald toucanet
Photo  by brian.gratwicke 


Status:
Least Concern

Scientific Classification:
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Piciformes
Family: Ramphastidae
Genus: Aulacorhynchus
Species: A. prasinus


General Information:

The Emerald Toucanet is the most widely distributed of all toucans, spanning from Mexico down as far south as Bolivia. Considered one of seven "mountain toucanets," this bird has fourteen subspecies existing throughout its range. It prefers to be in pairs or small flocks.

Physical Description:
When this bird reaches adult is usually 12 - 14 inches in length and weighs around 180 g. The male and female are similar in appearance, but the female is a little smaller with a slightly shorter bill. Both male and female are mostly green, like other members of its genus Aulachorhynchus. The Emerald Toucanet's bill is black with yellow on the upper mandible. There is also a small patch of white, blue, pale grey-blue, blue, or black on the throat, with the color depending on the subspecies.

Diet:
It feeds primarily on fruits, but will also eat bird eggs, insects, lizards, and other small prey.

Habitat:
This toucan occurs in humid forests, lowlands, as well as mountainous landscapes ranging from portions of Mexico through Central America, to northern Venezuela and south along the Andes to central Bolivia. The Emerald Toucanet often nests in an unlined hole in a tree, usually an old woodpecker's nest or sometimes a natural cavity.

Reproduction:
The female Emerald Toucanet lays three to four eggs per clutch, and both the male and the female incubate the eggs for a period of 14 to 15 days. The hatchlings are fed by both parents and fledge the nest after about 6 weeks.