Showing posts with label Mynah. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mynah. Show all posts

Monday, July 16, 2018

Fact Sheet: BALI MYNAH - Leucopsar rothschildi

(Original Title: Rainforest Birds - Bali Mynah)
Bali Mynah
Bali Mynah - Photo by jonkriz 
Bird Name:
Bali Mynah

Latin Name:
Leucopsar rothschildi

Status:
Critically endangered, Appendix I of CITIES

Scientific Classification:
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Sturnidae
Genus: Leucopsar
Species: L. rothschildi

General Information:
The Bali Mynah is also known as the Bali Starling or Rothschild's Mynah. They are endemic to the island of Bali in Indonesia and are the only surviving species. The species is critically endangered and there are only a dozen or two individuals remaining in the wild. The remaining population is under threat due to illegal bird trade and urbanization of the island. While the wild population has been struggling for years, there are a large number of captive birds in zoos. It is also listed in Appendix I of CITIES.

The Bali Mynahs are very vocal and communicate by whistling, squawking and bobbing their heads. They are the fauna symbol of Bali and locally are called kedis putih meaning white bird.

Physical Description:
This is a medium-sized stocky mynah, up to 25 cm in length. It is almost wholly white and has a long drooping crest. Black tips occur on the tail and wings. The Bali Mynah shows distinctive bare, blue skin around the eyes. It has gray legs and feet and a yellow bill. Sexes are similar. They weigh 90 to 100 gm.

Diet:
The Bali Mynahs eat fruit, seeds, and a variety of invertebrates. In dry seasons they will feed in groups.



Habitat:
Bali Mynahs will live in small groups in the forested region of Bali. Groups help them protect themselves from their predators, including snakes, lizards, monkeys, and birds of prey. Nests are built in tree cavities. It takes about two weeks for the pair to construct the nest from bark, leaves, and grass.

Reproduction:
In the wild, breeding season is in the rainy season which falls between November and April. A pair will produce two to three clutches per season. Clutch size is usually 3 eggs and incubation takes 13 to 14 days. The bluish-green eggs are incubated by both parents. The young Bali Mynahs will fledge in 15 to 25 days, but continue to be fed by both parents for a few weeks.



Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Fact Sheet: GREATER INDIA HILL MYNAH - Gracula Religiosa intermedia

(Original Title: Rainforest Birds - Greater India Hill Mynah)

English: Eastern Hill Myna (Gracula religiosa ...
Eastern Hill Myna (Gracula religiosa intermedia) in the Walsrode Bird Park, Germany. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bird Name:
Greater India Hill Mynah

Latin Name:
Gracula Religiosa intermedia
Status:
Least concern

Scientific Classification:
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Sturnidae
Genus: Gracula
Species: G. Religiosa
Subspecies: G. Religiosa intermedia

General information:
Commonly known as the Talking Mynah, the Greater India Hill Mynah is one of 10 subspecies of G. religiosa, and is considered the northern subspecies. The Greater India Hill Mynah is an extremely vocal bird and is renowned for its ability to imitate. Along with the Java Hill Myna (G. religiosa religiosa) they are the most commonly captured and imported of the Hill Mynahs for the pet trade. Described by many as the best talking bird in the world, Hill Mynahs can choose to imitate any human voice and speak in high or low tones.

Physical Description:
The Greater India Hill Mynah averages 27 cm in length but can reach up to 35 cm. It is much larger in size than the Lesser Hill Mynahs. It has glossy black feathers which turn purple-blue when exposed to the sunshine. The wings show a white band and there is obvious yellow skin behind and below the eyes. The eye and nape patches are connected, which distinguishes it from the other subspecies. The bill is orange with a yellow tip. The feet and legs are also yellow. Males and females are similar. Juveniles also resemble adults, except their coats are dull and may have a ragged appearance before their first molt.

Diet:
The diet consists of fruits, berries and seeds of various shrubs and trees. They are also known to eat insects and small lizards.

Habitat:
The Greater India Hill Mynah inhabits north India, China, Burma, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and the northern through central part of Thailand. They prefer areas of high rainfall and humidity and spend most of their lives in trees. They are known for inhabiting dense jungles near the forest edge, although they are now commonly found on tea and coffee plantations with many flowering shade trees. While not breeding large flocks accumulate, but couples are obvious.


Reproduction:
The Greater India Hill Mynah nests in small tree holes usually located at the forest edge. Several pairs may nest in the same tree without territorial aggression. The monogamous pair searches together for the nesting site. Both sexes fill the hole with twigs, leaves, and feathers. Females instigate copulation by stretching horizontally and flapping their tails up and down quickly. The average clutch is 2 eggs which are blue with brown spots. Incubation lasts 13-17 days and the majority is done by the female. Parents will feed the nestlings together and they will leave them unattended when searching for food. The young fledge after a month and the pair will begin a new clutch. Hill mynas average 2-3 clutches per year, with the most occurring in warmer climates. Breeding is between April and July, although it does vary slightly by region.




Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Fact Sheet: BANK MYNA - Acridotheres ginginianus

(Original Title: Rainforest Birds - Bank Myna)

English: Bank Myna Acridotheres ginginianus at...
Bank Myna( Acridotheres ginginianus )
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bird Name:
Bank Myna

Latin Name:
Acridotheres ginginianus


Status:

Least Concern

Scientific Classification:
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Sturnidae
Genus: Acridotheres
Species: A. ginginianus


General Information:
The Bank Myna is an endemic species of South Asia, where it is known locally by a diverse collection of names, including the Ganga Myna, the Bardi Myna, and the Daryla Myna. This bird is similar in its coloration to the Common Myna, with which it also shares its range, but is smaller. It is a gregarious bird and is often see in flocks during the breeding season.

Physical Description:
On average it is 8 - 8.5 inches in length. It is a stocky bird, blue-grayish in plumage with darker colored wings. It has a black head with an orange bill and orange eye patches. The sexes are similar in appearance, but the juvenile is paler and browner in color.

Diet:
It feeds on fruits, grains, and insects. Because it feeds on sorghum, it can be destructive to crops. At the same time, the Bank Myna also eats pest insects, making it beneficial to crops as well.



Habitat:
It is often found in river bank habitats
as well as in open country and near human habitation. Its range covers portions of Pakistan, northern Indian and east to Bangladesh. Individuals have also been spotted as far as Afghanistan. It utilizes a variety of spaces for nesting, including tunnels in riverbanks, earthen wells and sides of disused brick kilns.

Reproduction:
The nesting season for the bird occurs from May to August, principally from April to June. The female generally lays 3 - 5 glossy pale-blue eggs per clutch.